Lesson #4: Art for a Cause - Northern Lights

2-03-2021 Zoom link to Lesson #4: Art for a Cause - Northern Lights https://us02web.zoom.us/j/86014978570

 

 

Materials needed:
1 - 8" x 8" black construction paper

1- 9" X 12" cardstock (any color)

1 - 2" x 2" cardboard or chipboard

1 - Set of oil pastels – red, orange, yellow, green, blue, violet, and white
1 - Black acrylic or Tempra paint (1 oz)
1 - White acrylic or Tempra paint (1 oz)
3 - Cotton swab sticks (Q-Tips)

Project info – We will continue to study landscapes, moving from a representational landscape to an abstract landscape featuring the northern lights. We will work with color, negative space, balance, contrast, size, distance, and proportion. Instead of studying a specific artist, we will discuss how artists use their works as a voice, often times creating art for a cause. In the case of this project, the cause was bringing attention to Alaskan Conservation.

 *Scroll down for information on the Art Docent program and for past lessons.*

What is the Art Docent Program?

 

At Crestwood, we love to see students express themselves in creative ways and 
are determined to bring art to the attention of even our youngest students. the PTA has partnered with Green River College's ICA (Interurban Center for the Arts - https://greenrivercollegefoundation.org/ica) to bring fine arts into the classroom by supplementing the classroom art curriculum. Docents are volunteers with varying degrees of art training or ability that work toward introducing kids to famous artists, artistic movements, and the basic elements of art and principles of art design. 

 

In a typical year, an art docent or set of docents come into the classroom once a month to teach a small art history lesson then lead an art activity based on an artistic idea or concept. The good news is that lessons and training are provided for docents. So, no experience is required. For questions or to volunteer, please contact Art Docent Chair Tiffany Phillips at tiffanyphillips85@yahoo.com.

 

During remote learning, docents will host one lesson per month for all students K-6 on the 1st Wednesday of each month. They will then be available on the Crestwood PTA 9 7 11 YouTube page.

For general information about the Art Docent Program itself, visit this page: https://www.artdocentprogram.com/the-art-docent-program/what-is-it/

Art Docent Lessons

Lesson #1: Jean-Michel Basquiat

 11-04-2020 Link to Lesson #1: Self-Portrait in the style of Jean-Michel Basquiat
 Watch on YouTube: https://youtu.be/VABUEvAEP30

 

Materials needed:

1 - 9’ X 12’ Multi-media or watercolor paper
1 - Set of crayons – basic set of 8

1 - White crayon

1 - Watercolors – basic set of 8

1 - Paintbrush

1 - Black acrylic or Tempra paint (1 oz) - optional

 

Artist info – Jean-Michel Basquiat was born in Brooklyn, New York, on
December 22, 1960. With a Haitian-American father and a Puerto Rican mother, Basquiat's
diverse cultural heritage was one of his many sources of inspiration. After his mother was
institutionalized for mental illness, Basquiat left home at 17 and eventually rose to prominence
as a street artist by the name of SUMO. By the time he was 20, he had his first art show, and his
art took off in the middle of the neo-expressionist movement. His work and style received critical
acclaim for the fusion of words, symbols, stick figures, and animals. Soon, his paintings came to
be adored by an art-loving public that had no problem paying as much as $50,000 for a Basquiat
original. Basquiat died in 1988 at 27 years old in the prime of his popularity. Art collectors value
his work, and in 2017, Basquiat’s 1982 painting of a skull called “Untitled”, sold for $110.5
million dollars, making it the most money ever paid for art created by an American artist, for
artwork created past 1980, and by a Black artist.

Lesson #2: Sonia Delaunay

12-02-2020 Link to Lesson #2: Colorful Geometry in the style of Sonia Delaunay

Watch on YouTube: https://youtu.be/ubkP2fvXas8

 
We will explore the marriage of bold colors and geometric shapes using the style of Orphism, an art movement co-founded by Sonia and Robert Delaunay. This lesson we will focus on the Principle of Design called Rhythm as well as talk a bit about color theory. 

 

Materials List:

1 - 8" X 12" multimedia or sketch paper
1 - Set of crayons – basic set of 8
1 - Black Sharpie

5 - Circle templates ( 1 each of 1", 1.5", 2", 2.75", 3.5")*

10 - Cotton swab sticks (Q-Tips)
1 - Pencil
1 - 1 Tablespoon vegetable oil

1- Paper towel or napkin

Optional Materials:

1 - Watercolor set

1 - Math compass (to be used instead of circle templates)

 

Artist info – Sonia Delaunay was born, Sarah Ilinitchna Stern, most likely born on 14 November 1885 in Hradyzk, Ukraine (today Poltava Oblast) then part of the Russian Empire. She showed an early interest in art and was taken in and eventually adopted by her well-establish aunt and uncle. At 18 she was sent to Germany to art school but got bored with the constaints of painting at the time. She wanted less rules and more color. As a result, she developed her own style of art.

Sonia Delaunay was a painter and designer who utilized bright colors and geometric shapes in her work. Her art was influenced by both Russian and French styles, and she is remembered for both her fine arts and applied arts, particularly in fabrics and textiles. Her interest in art-deco and abstract art influenced her work in many areas, including fashion and costume design as well as interior design. Although she is associated with several artistic movements, she is most often connected with a school of art called ‘Orphism’, which branched out of ‘Cubism’. This was an artistic style that she and her husband Robert developed together, beginning in the pre-WWI era. Whether she was painting or working with fabric, she generally used bright colors and repeating patterns.

 

She is remembered for her innovative dress and costume designs as well as interior design objects and design work she did for stage sets and films. Although she often thought of her textile work as a kind of exercise to help her in what she saw as her more important work of painting, she may have left behind a deeper legacy in the world of fashion design. She created many beautiful and sophisticated fabrics. She died in Paris in 1979 at 94 years old. 

Lesson #3: Landscapes


1-6-2021 Zoom Link to Lesson #3: Landscapes - https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85253966009

Watch on YouTube: https://youtu.be/Rfg_CPdg2JE


Materials needed:
1 - 6" X 9" Multi-media or drawing paper
1 - Drawing pencil Prismacolor Ebony soft graphite pencil or any 2B drawing pencil
1 - Polymer Eraser (any specifically used for sketching)

Project info – We will follow the evolution of landscapes from Chinese artists born 1, 000 years ago, to the modern landscape artists of today. We'll talk about the definition of landscapes, the three different kinds of landscapes (representational, abstract, and impressionistic), and the elements of art and principles of design used for landscapes, focusing primarily on: line, shape, emphasis, balance, unity, value, and size.